Bonsai Trees For Sale In Fort Lauderdale

Unbeatable Prices and Unmatched Quality Since 1963!

If you want beginner bonsai trees, an especially hard to find bonsai tree species, or that truly unique perfect gift...WELCOME! You've come to the right place!

Our bonsai trees are imported directly from China, hand-picked from the most reputable local growers, or styled from scratch by our very own experienced professional.

Our goal has always been not to sell any 'finished' tree until it meets or exceeds the time honored standards and principles of this ancient art form.

For over 30 years, we have studied and adhered to these ideals producing the largest collection of bonsai trees in Fort Lauderdale at the most reasonable prices you will find!

This means you can rest assured that unlike many, many other dealers, Flower City will never try to sell you an overpriced ordinary plant (or sapling) in a fancy pot just by calling it a bonsai.

But don't take our word for it. Please, shop around and YOU be the judge. And while you're at it, see how many others have the confidence to urge you to do the same!

Best Priced Bonsai Trees In Fort Lauderdale

Real Bonsai Trees!

Take A Look At These Beginner Bonsai Trees

Assorted Bonsai Trees

Fukien Tea Bonsai Tiger Bark Ficus Bonsai
Fukien Tea Bonsai
Tiger Bark Ficus Bonsai
$29.99 ea.
$29.99 ea.
Chinese

Sweet Plum Bonsai Chinese 

Elm Bonsai
Chinese Sweet Plum Bonsai
Chinese Elm Bonsai
$29.99 ea.
$29.99 ea.

Bonsai Trees

Desert Rose Bonsai (Adenium Obesum) Youpon Holly Bonsai (Ilex vomitoria)
Desert Rose Bonsai (Adenium Obesum)
Youpon Holly Bonsai (Ilex Vomitoria)
Chinese Privet Bonsai (Ligustrum sinense) Gardenia 'Vietnam' Bonsai (Gardenia vietnamensis)
Chinese Privet Bonsai (Ligustrum Sinense)
Gardenia 'Vietnam' Bonsai (Gardenia Vietnamensis)
Mini Jade Bonsai (Portulacaria Afra) Green Island Ficus Bonsai (Ficus Microcarpa)
Mini Jade Bonsai (Portulacaria Afra)
Green Island Ficus Bonsai (Ficus Microcarpa)
Juniper Bonsai (Juniperus Parsonii) Youpon Holly Bonsai (Ilex Vomitoria)
Juniper Bonsai (Juniperus Parsonii)
Youpon Holly Bonsai (Ilex Vomitoria)
Green Island Ficus Bonsai (Ficus Microcarpa) Mini Jade Bonsai (Portulacaria Afra)
Green Island Ficus Bonsai (Ficus Microcarpa)
Mini Jade Bonsai (Portulacaria Afra)
Chinese Elm Bonsai (Ulmus Parvifolia) Willow Leaf Ficus Bonsai (Ficus Salicifolia)
Chinese Elm Bonsai (Ulmus Parvifolia)
Willow Leaf Ficus Bonsai (Ficus Salicifolia)
Fukien Tea Bonsai (Carmona microphylla) Neea Buxifolia Bonsai
Fukien Tea Bonsai (Carmona Microphylla)
Neea Buxifolia Bonsai
Chinese Privet Bonsai (Ligustrum Sinense) Tiger Bark Ficus Bonsai (Ficus Retusa)
Chinese Privet Bonsai (Ligustrum Sinense)
Tiger Bark Ficus Bonsai (Ficus Retusa)

Chinese Penjing and Japanese Bonsai Trees

Now, let's talk a little history...

The Chinese art of penjing evolved thousands of years ago. Its Japanese relative bonsai, although derived from penjing has adapted a little differently over its thousand year history.

As both art forms advanced, they developed their own unique aesthetics and terminology. Both however, still reflect the natural world, man's relation to it and nature's effect on it.

Bonsai (pronounced bone-sigh) and penjing (pronounced pen-jing) are both singular and plural. In Chinese "pen" means pot or container and "jing" is translated as landscape or scenery.

The various elements used are the container/tray, rocks, trees, soil, water, grasses or moss, and figures (human, animal, or architectural). Not every element is required in every creation, often these are simply inferred in the overall composition.

Many penjing (typically landscapes), use rock in their design. The artist is not trying to create an exact copy of a landscape. Instead, he or she tries to portray an ideal image able to evoke an emotion the viewer can "recall" based on their own individual experiences with nature.

Texas Ebony Penjing Group Planting Chinese Elm Bonsai Forest
Texas Ebony Penjing Group Planting
Chinese Elm Bonsai Forest

Of the tree basic types of penjing (tree, landscape, or water and land), bonsai is most directly related to tree penjing. In Japanese "bon" means plant or tree and "sai" means pot or tray. Most often in bonsai, woody plants are grown in containers as representations of aged or interesting trees.

The most common depictions are: single tree, multiple tree, and forest. Like penjing, bonsai has never been an attempt to create scale models. Rather, this living art form is carefully developed over years as a "statement" about: trees, man's interaction with them, or the often dramatic effects nature's cycles have on them.

True mastery of bonsai and penjing requires considerable knowledge of horticultural and aesthetic techniques to say the least. Carrying out the art of miniaturizing trees alone is a fascinating process. Doing so with strict adherence to various artistic principles while also attempting to depict the often formidable forces of nature itself, is nothing short of astonishing.

Needless to say, one must both possess and be able to convey a deep sense of reverence for the natural world. Is it any wonder then, that both these art forms are so deeply embedded in the histories and cultures in which they originated, or that we, in the west have become so fascinated with them?

Bonsai Tree Buyers Beware!

Many so called dealers, who operate on-line, or those in big-box store chains for example, often carry "bonsai" that are little more than inexpensive garden variety plants, saplings, or even barely rooted cuttings that are quickly and carelessly stuffed in a fancy pot.

Their accepted notion of this ancient art form in which carefully grown miniature trees are revered and handed down for generations seems instead, to be one of buy low and sell high all the small "trees" they can get their hands on.

The same generic soil mix is used for every single plant regardless of each species growth habits, nutrient requirements, or actual soil needs and off they go!

Unfortunately for the buyer, such less than forthright time and money saving misrepresentations do not necessarily reflect in the price. These impostor "bonsai" can and do receive a very hefty mark up evidently despite the fact that they are--NOT--miniature trees at all. Be very wary of those willing to cash in quick with these and similar shortcuts.

All the unsuspecting buyer really gets as a result of these assembly line methods are substantially weakened juvenile plants that somehow managed to live through the initial transplant shock. That is all!

These mass produced remnants potted in a one-soil-fits-all mix sold on- line or rushed off to hundreds of store locations nationwide can only decline! When they do, more often than not, their explanation/excuse will be that YOU did something wrong since YOU were sold a "healthy" bonsai tree.

Sadly, the story does not even end there...

On-line, the buyer will face the daunting task of randomly picking somebody hundreds, maybe thousands of miles away, blindly buying their plant in whatever state it may be in and then paying enormous overnight shipping charges. At the giant chain he or she can fully expect that it employs minimally paid workers right off the street with no background or experience in plant care whatsoever.

In other words, getting sound or sensible advice for your already stressed little plant they're calling a "bonsai" will be highly unlikely, if not completely impossible.


Custom Floral Designs

Modern Flower Arrangements

phalenopsis orchid white

Dendrobium orchid purple

Bromeliad plant